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Overview

Framework:
RQF
Level:
Level 2
Unit No:
F/505/5356
Credits:
6
Guided learning hours:
48 hours

Assessment Guidance

Portfolio of Evidence.

Unit Learning Outcomes

1.

Know the importance and functions of the carbon cycle.

Indicative Content

Learners should be introduced to the carbon cycle in terms of its importance and be able to outline each stage. They should research how humans can intervene in the carbon cycle, for example using combustion/burning trees or bracken to increase carbon dioxide levels and therefore the rate of photosynthesis.

Learners could go on to describe how humans can utilise the carbon cycle, in e.g. greenhouses and polytunnels, for their own benefit to increase the rate of plant growth commercially. They could also review researched data to analyse the effects of human intervention on the natural carbon cycle that cause local and global changes.

Assessment Criteria

  • 1.1
    Outline the importance of the carbon cycle.
  • 1.2
    Describe the effects of human intervention on the carbon cycle.

2.

Know the importance and functions of the nitrogen cycle.

Indicative Content

Learners should be introduced to the nitrogen cycle in terms of its importance and be able to outline each stage describing some of the processes involved, such as denitrification (names of bacteria are not required). They could go on to describe the nitrogen cycle and describe how humans can affect it, e.g. use of fertilisers containing nitrates to improve soil quality and so plant growth. In addition, learners could explain the importance of the nitrogen cycle and research in order to explain how human intervention can disrupt the natural nitrogen cycle to benefit humans and to cause global issues. An example of this could be leaching of nitrate fertilisers into water ways causing increased algal growth or exhaust emissions releasing nitrous oxides into the atmosphere.

Assessment Criteria

  • 2.1
    Outline the importance of the nitrogen cycle.
  • 2.2
    Outline some of the processes in the nitrogen cycle.

3.

Know the processes that produce undesirable atmospheric changes.

Indicative Content

Learners should outline different factors that adversely change the atmosphere, such as combustion, factory and car emissions. They should describe how both natural processes, such as volcanoes and human activities, such as car exhaust emissions and the use of CFCs, produce atmospheric changes. They could research to find current evidence that suggests humans contribute to global warming and/or destruction of the ozone layer. They could also describe the scientific processes involved in this current evidence and analyse evidential data that quantifies the atmospheric changes caused by humans.

Assessment Criteria

  • 3.1
    Outline different factors that adversely change the atmosphere.
  • 3.2
    Describe how both natural processes and human activities produce atmospheric changes.
  • 3.3
    Describe how these processes may lead to global warming and/or destruction of the ozone layer.

4.

Know the economic and social consequences of pollution caused by humans.

Indicative Content

Learners should be able to give examples of how humans pollute local environments, for example, litter, noise, factory and car emissions and recognise the processes that pollute the air. They should outline changes that can be attributed to human pollution both locally, e.g. trampling of grass on sports fields, and globally e.g. acid rain and global warming. They could go on to explain how the effects of pollution by humans can be minimised in terms of reducing harmful emissions by a reduction in polluting transport and/or by using greener fuels and/or chimney filtration or neutralisation systems.

Those working at higher levels might recognise and describe the global effects of human pollution in terms of their economic and social consequences and predict possible social and economic outcomes of continued human pollution over time. An example might be a study of global warming and its consequences over time.

Assessment Criteria

  • 4.1
    Give examples of how humans pollute local environments.
  • 4.2
    Outline changes that can be attributed to human pollution locally and globally.

5.

Understand the arguments for the continued expansion of recycling programmes.

Indicative Content

Learners should recognise and describe why it is important to recycle aluminium, glass, steel and plastic, and describe ways that they can be recycled, possibly by looking at local recycling schemes

Maintaining the focus on a local recycling scheme, they should outline the reasons for expanding this recycling programmes. Learners could research in order to assess the relative merits of recycling, reusing and reducing waste. They could analyse given data related to recycling, reusing and reducing waste to suggest future expansions within the industry.

Assessment Criteria

  • 5.1
    Describe why it is important to recycle aluminium, glass, steel and plastic.
  • 5.2
    Described ways that these materials are recycled.
  • 5.3
    Outline the reasons for expanding recycling programmes.

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